Early Citrix history

Being that I started first at Citrix in 1993, I know a fair amount of Citrix history.  There are many people that now work for the company, but when we first started there was less than 50 people.  It was a family of sorts.  When the company was first founded in 1989, most of the people left IBM Boca Raton from jobs in OS/2 to go start a Multiuser OS/2 venture.  Instead of dealing with IBM, it was decided to license the code from Microsoft instead.  Ed Iacobucci had a vision of providing a server on OS/2 that could give similar functionality to Unix.

Unfortunately no one really wanted to run OS/2 text based applications due to the fact that there were so few of them.  From the high of 1989 to the low of early 1993, it didn’t look like the company would make it.  I remember vividly in early 1993 the whole company being brought into the conference room and being told that it didn’t look like we were going to get paychecks that week.  The silence was huge.  I remember thinking that perhaps I had made a large mistake leaving IBM to join such a small company.  At the last minute, more money was raised and a new round of investors were called in and company had enough money to run until the next crisis.  We were all aware of how close we were to going under.  Luckily this memory is the worst it got at Citrix in those early days.  We really didn’t thrive until we released WinFrame and we went public in 1995.  1993 was really the worst it got.

Live near Brisbane, Australia. Software developer currently focused on iOS and Android. Avid Google Local Guide

Posted in Citrix History
4 comments on “Early Citrix history
  1. Wow! You must be one of the original developers.

  2. jeffreymuir says:

    I was actually hired during the second wave of developers at Citrix. The original wave started in 1989. By the time I started, a few of the original developers had left. Quite a few stayed even though they had gone through what they called a “death march” during the development of Multiuser.

    There were big promises made to the original developers by the manager of the time and it was hard to believe in late 1992 that any of that would come true.

    Two of the original developers that left Citrix had warned me not to join based on the trouble they saw. Personally I thought it was worth the risk.

    I think my employee number was something like 54. Because I left in 1997 and rejoined in 1999 I lost this number. To me, it really doesn’t matter. I played the number game for awhile but realized it really wasn’t that important. My current number was re-adjusted again during a company re-organization. So, that means my number is in the upper 2000s.

  3. […] If you had told me in 1993 that in the year 2006 we would be a 3000 employee company with close to $1B in revenue, I don’t think I would have believed you.  I would have especially disbelieved you the week that they told us there might not be enough money to pay us that pay cycle (http://citrite.org/blogs/jeffreymuir/2006/09/12/early-citrix-history/). […]

  4. […] If you had told me in 1993 that in the year 2006 we would be a 3000 employee company with close to $1B in revenue, I don’t think I would have believed you. I would have especially disbelieved you the week that they told us there might not be enough money to pay us that pay cycle (http://citrixblogger.org/2006/09/12/early-citrix-history/). […]

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